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Your Prescription

You will require an up to date prescription in order for us to supply spectacle or contact lenses. You may request a copy of your spectacle or contact lens prescription from your optometrist or optical dispenser. In the interest of good eye health a valid prescription is required for dispensing of spectacle and contact lenses.

 

A spectacle prescription is valid for 2 years from the date of your eye test.

 

A contact lens prescription is valid for 1 year from the date of your eye test.

 

Understanding Your Prescription

 

Your optometrist will provide you with a valid spectacle or contact lens prescription in a similar format as shown below.

 

You will be prompted at checkout to provide us with your prescription. This can be done by either entering in your prescription details at checkout or emailing us a copy of your prescription.

 

Example: Spectacle Prescription

 

 

Sphere (SPH)

Cylinder (CYL)

Axis

ADD

Right (OD)

 

 

 

 

Left    (OS)

 

 

 

 

Pupillary Distance (PD)

This may be provided as a distance or near measurement in millimetres. Please see below for more information.

Additional Information:

Your optometrist may provide additional information such as prism, lens type, intermediate ADD for computer usage, lens tint or any other relevant requirements.

 

Example: Contact Lens Prescription

 

 

Sphere (SPH)

Cylinder (CYL)

Axis

ADD

Base Curve

Lens Diameter

Right (OD)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left (OS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Information:

Contact Lens Brand:

Note: You can also find your contact lens prescription information on the side of your contact lens box.

 

Sphere (SPH)

The Sphere Power (SPH) is the measurement of long or short sightedness. Long sightedness is indicated by a positive number (+) and short sightedness is indicated by a negative number (-).

 

Cylinder (CYL)

The Cylinder (CYL) is the measurement of your astigmatism and is indicated by a positive number (+) or negative number (-).

 

Axis

If you have a measurement for Cylinder (CYL), you will also have an axis value.

 

ADD

The Additional (ADD) value is for those requiring reading glasses or bifocals. This measurement indicates the power added to your Sphere (SPH) value for reading or close up work.

 

If you have a prescription for reading glasses or bifocals and you only see one ADD power, it is understood that you have the same ADD power for both eyes. If you do not see an ADD power, leave it blank.

 

Right (OD)

Right Eye. The first line of your prescription is always for the right eye. It may be referred to as OD.

 

Left (OS)

Left Eye. The second line of your prescription is always for the left eye. It may be referred to as OS.

 

Pupillary Distance (PD)

The Pupillary Distance (PD) is the distance between the centre of the pupils of your eyes, measured in millimetres.

 

When prescription glasses are manufactured, the distance between the optical centres of the glasses' lenses, is the same as your PD. An accurate PD is a required measurement to manufacture your prescription glasses.

 

A PD measurement is also something you can measure yourself or with the help of a friend. For further information on how to measure your PD, please see How to Measure my Pupillary Distance (PD) below.

 

Base Curve (BC) - Contact Lenses Only

The Base Curve (BC) indicates how the lens fits on the eye. It is typically shown as 8._ or 9._. Some brands show it as flat (8.9 -> 9.1), medium (8.4 -> 8.8) or steep (8.0 -> 8.3).

 

Diameter (DIA) - Contact Lenses Only

The Diameter (DIA) is the diameter of the contact lens and is shown as a number between 13._ -> 15._. The most common diameter is 14._.

 

Additional Information

Your optometrist may provide additional information such as prism, lens type, intermediate ADD for computer usage, lens tint or any other relevant requirements.

 

Lens Type

You will need to specify the type of lenses you require for your spectacle lenses. You must indicate this on the product page when selecting your frame and lenses.

 

Distance Wear

Distance glasses are required for wearers who cannot see objects clearly from a distance. Distance glasses are generally used for outdoor or indoor activities such as sports, driving, watching television or in the classroom.

 

Reading Only

Reading glasses are required for wearers who cannot see objects clearly for close up tasks. Reading  glasses are generally used for near activities such as reading, using a phone/tablet or hobby activities.

 

Computer Vision

Computer glasses contain customised prescription lenses for computer/intermediate distance use. These lenses are designed to be used when you are working in front of the computer or other specific tasks such as reading music sheets on a stand.

 

Computer screens are normally positioned between 50 -> 75cm away from the users eyes. This is considered to be an intermediate zone of vision, closer than distance wear but further away from the reading distance. Computer vision lenses are available in either single vision or multi-focal lenses. Please see our Lens Guide for more information.

 

Sizing and Fit

Frames are measured in millimetres by lens diameter, lens height and nose bridge width. Where these dimensions are available, we have included this information in the Features table on the product page to help you estimate how they will fit your face.

 

                                                         

 

 

How to Measure your Pupillary Distance (PD)

 

 

Measuring your own PD using a mirror:

 

When measuring you own PD, you will require a mirror and a ruler with clear millimetre markings. You should measure your PD with your glasses off. If you are having difficulty seeing the numbers on the ruler, we recommend option 2, which is having a friend measure your PD.

 

1. Whilst looking into a mirror, hold a ruler against the bridge of your nose with your right hand.

 

2. Close your right eye, and line the '0' up with the centre of the pupil of your left eye as shown in the diagram.

 

 

3. Without moving your head or the ruler open your right eye and close your left eye. Read the number that lines up with the centre of the pupil of the right eye. This number represents your Distance PD in millimetres. You have just used this technique to measure your Distance PD.

 

 

 

PLEASE NOTE: Sometimes it is difficult to measure your PD from the centre of your pupil. Instead of lining up the ruler with the centre of the pupil, it is more accurate to use the edge of the pupil as shown in the diagram below. You should measure from the inside edge of one pupil to the outside edge of the other pupil.

 

 

4. Repeat this process 3 times to get a consistent measurement in millimetres. Take an average of the 3 measurements to get your final Distance PD. Make sure your head and the ruler do not move during the measurement process as this can cause inaccurate readings.

 

To get your Near PD, which is used for reading or computer glasses, subtract 2mm from your Distance PD measurement.

 

For Example:

Distance PD = 62mm

Near PD = 62 - 2 = 60mm

 

When you enter your PD in the prescription form during the checkout, you will need to enter either your Distance PD or Near PD depending on the lens type you are ordering. Please see the table below on which PD to use.

 

Lens Type

PD Type

Distance Wear

Distance PD

Reading Only

Near PD

Computer Vision

Near PD

Computer Vision and Reading

Near PD

 

Getting a Friend to Measure Your PD:

 

In this technique a friend is used to measure your PD.

 

1. You should be sitting down approximately 45cm away from your friend.

 

       

 

2. Your friend should hold the ruler against the bridge of your nose with their right hand. The person having their PD measured should look at the tip of their friends nose with both eyes open for the duration of the measurement process.

 

3. Your friend should close their right eye and line the 0 up with the centre of the pupil of your right eye as shown in the diagram.

 

4. Without moving their head, your friend should open their right eye and close their left eye. Your friend should read the number that lines up with centre of your left eye as shown in the diagram. This number represents your Near PD in millimetres. You have just used this technique to measure your Near PD.

 

PLEASE NOTE: Sometimes it is difficult to measure your PD from the centre of your pupil. Instead of lining up the ruler with the centre of the pupil, it is more accurate to use the edge of the pupil as shown in the diagram below. You should measure from the inside edge of one pupil to the outside edge of the other pupil.

 

 

5. Repeat this process 3 times to get a consistent measurement in millimetres. Take an average of the 3 measurements to get your final Near PD. Make sure your head and the ruler do not move during the measurement process as this can cause inaccurate readings.

 

To get your Distance PD, which is used for distance glasses, add 2mm from your Near PD measurement.

 

For Example:

Near PD = 60mm

Distance PD = 60 + 2 = 62mm

 

When you enter your PD in the prescription form during the checkout, you will need to enter either your Distance PD or Near PD depending on the lens type you are ordering. Please see the table below on which PD to use.

 

Lens Type

PD Type

Distance Wear

Distance PD

Reading Only

Near PD

Computer Vision

Near PD

Computer Vision and Reading

Near PD

 

PLEASE NOTE: When you measure your own PD by using the above techniques you may not get the same result as an experienced professional. We recommend that you use the measurements taken by an optometrist or an optical dispenser whenever possible as optometrists and optical dispensers may use more accurate techniques to measure your PD. This page is provided for information purposes only. We do not take any responsibility for the accuracy of measurements taken by anyone referring to this information.

 

 

 

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